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Mon Feb 11

Applied and Computational Mathematics Seminar

3:30pm - Vincent Hall 113
Applied and Computational Mathematics Seminar
Vera Andreeva rescheduled - February 18
Mon Feb 18

Applied and Computational Mathematics Seminar

3:35pm - Vincent Hall 113
Nonperturbative nonlinear effects in the dispersion relations for TE and TM plasmons on two-dimensional materials
Vera Andreeva

We analytically obtain the dispersion relations for transverse-electric (TE) and transverse-magnetic (TM) surface plasmon-polaritons in a nonlinear two-dimensional (2D) conducting material with inversion symmetry lying between two Kerr-type dielectric media. To this end, we use Maxwell's equations within the quasielectrostatic, weakly dissipative regime. We show that the wavelength and propagation distance of surface plasmons decrease due to the nonlinearity of the surrounding dielectric. In contrast, the effect of the nonlinearity of the 2D material depends on the signs of the real and imaginary parts of the third-order conductivity. Notably, the dispersion relations obtained by naively replacing the permittivity of the dielectric medium by its nonlinear counterpart in the respective dispersion relations of the linear regime are not accurate. We apply our analysis to the case of doped graphene and make predictions for the surface plasmon wavelength and propagation distance.

Mon Feb 25

Applied and Computational Mathematics Seminar

3:35pm - Vincent Hall 113
Primal dual methods for Wasserstein gradient flows
Li Wang, University of Minnesota

We develop a variational method for nonlinear equations with a gradient flow structure. Such equations arise in applications of a wide range, such as porous median flows, material science, animal swarms, and chemotaxis. Our method builds on the JKO framework, which evolves the equation as a gradient flow with respect to the Wasserstein metric. As a result, our method has built-in positivity preserving, entropy decreasing properties, and overcomes stability issue due to the strong nonlinearity and degeneracy. Furthermore, our method is massively parallelizable, and thus extremely efficient in high dimensions. Upon discretization of the PDE constraint, we also prove the ??convergence of the fully discrete optimization towards the continuum JKO scheme.

Mon Mar 25

Applied and Computational Mathematics Seminar

3:35pm - Vincent Hall 113
Low rankness in forward and inverse kinetic theory
Qin Li, University of Wisconsin

Multi-scale kinetic equations can be compressed: in certain regimes, the Boltzmann equation is asymptotically equivalent to the Euler equations, and the radiative transfer equation is asymptotically equivalent to the diffusion equation. A lot of detailed information is lost when a system passes to the limit. In linear algebra, it is equivalent to a system being of low rank. I will discuss such transition and how it affects the computation: mainly, in the forward regime, inserting low-rankness could greatly advances the computation, while in the inverse regime, the system being of low rank typically makes the problems significantly harder.

Mon May 06

Applied and Computational Mathematics Seminar

3:35pm - Vincent Hall 113
On localizing and concentrating of electromagnetic fields
Yi-Hsuan Lin, University of Jyvaskyla

We consider field localizing and concentration of electromagnetic waves governed by the time-harmonic anisotropic Maxwell system in a bounded domain. It is shown that there always exist certain boundary inputs which can generate electromagnetic fields with energy localized/concentrated in a given subdomain while nearly vanishing in another given subdomain. The theoretical results may have potential applications in telecommunication, inductive charging and medical therapy. We also derive a related Runge approximation result for the time-harmonic anisotropic Maxwell system with partial boundary data.