Earth
Richard McGehee University of Minnesota
School of Mathematics

 

The Mathematics of Climate

 

 
 
   
   

Perspectives on Resilience using Stommel's Ocean Box Model

Kate Meyer
School of Mathematics

Discussion of the resilience of natural systems pervades modern conversations about sustainability. Often, resilience is defined qualitatively as a system's capacity to absorb disturbance and maintain its structure and function, but metaphors to basins of attraction suggest a mathematical interpretation is possible. The Resilience Working Group of MCRN is attempting to quantify resilience in a dynamical systems framework. In this talk I'll report on several possible measures of resilience, using Stommel's ocean box model to illustrate them.

11:15 Tuesday, February 24, 2015
570 Vincent Hall

 

Time and Location

The meetings are held in 570 Vincent Hall at 11:15 on Tuesdays, followed by an extended discussion over lunch at the Bona Restaurant.

WebEx Session

We will broadcast the seminar to remote participants via WebEx. If you would like to receive a weekly invitation to the sessions, please either
(1) join the "Minnesota Mathematics of Climate Seminar" focus group by logging on to the MCRN Website, or
(2) send an email to Jon Hahn <hahnx240@umn.edu>.

If you are not a member of the MCRN, you can join by sending a request to info@mathclimate.org.

 

Organizers

Richard McGehee, School of Mathematics, mcgehee@umn.edu
Clarence Lehman, Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior, lehman@umn.edu

 

Description

This seminar examines some of the simpler mathematical models of climate in the recent literature. Participants are encouraged to read a paper and report on it to the other participants, but passive participation is also welcomed. Course credit can be arranged either through the School of Mathematics or the Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior by arrangement with the organizers.

 

Acknowledgement

This seminar is associated with the NSF sponsored Mathematics and Climate Research Network.

 

Last update: February 22, 2015 ©2015 Richard McGehee